CLASSIFICATION & TYPE DESCRIPTION OF PLASTICS

A thermoplastic, or thermosoftening plastic, is a plastic material, polymer that becomes pliable or moldable above a specific temperature and solidifies upon cooling. Most thermoplastics have a high molecular weight.

There are multiple thermoplastic resins that offer various performance benefits, but most materials commonly offer high strength, shrink-resistance and easy bendability. Thermoplastics are frequently used in manufacturing plastic labware. The most frequently used thermoplastics are polypropylene and polyethylene.

POLYPROPYLENE

Polypropylene (PP) is a linear hydrocarbon polymer, expressed as CnH2n. PP is a polyolefin or saturated polymer. Polypropylene is one of those most versatile polymers available with applications, both as a plastic and as a fibre.

  • Highly transparent, elastic thermoplastic.
  • Similar structure to PE, with a methyl group attached to alternate carbon atoms in an isotactic arrangement.
  • Temprature range from 0°C to +125°C.
  • Good tensile strength and dimensional stability.

  • Good chemical stability, comparable to PE.
  • Typical products are, for example: Class B volumetric flasks, Class B measuring cylinders, measuring pitchers, sample containers, funnels.
  • Good thermal stability.

PE-HD HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE

  • Transparent, elastic thermoplastic .
  • Good thermal stability.
  • Temprature range from -50°C to +105°C.
  • Good chemical stability.

  • Better chemical stability to organic solvents compared to PE-LD.
  • Typical products are, for example Bottles: buckets, scoops.

*For the storage of light-sensitive materials, also available in brown-dyed version.

PE-LD LOW-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE

PC POLYCARBONATE

Polycarbonate is virtually unbreakable. Through its high impact resistance, it provides greater safety and comfort for applications where reliability and high performance are essential.

PS POLYSTYRENE